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Chief Executive’s notes

HCSA General Secretary Eddie Saville casts his eye over some of the latest issues

Doctors in Training

The anger exhibited by many doctors in training over the current contract dispute is one that has seen thousands of junior doctors mobilised into campaigning for a fair deal.

It is always the case that if union members – and non-union members for that matter – stick together and speak with one voice it can make a difference.

The government seem to be starting to recognise the strength of feeling that exists and the growing call from members that these proposed changes now be the process of genuine negotiation. 

Trades Union Congress

In September the HCSA took centre stage at the TUC conference in Brighton. A detailed report is on page six.

We were able to highlight our recent stress survey, which saw trade unions and professional bodies from across a multitude of industries shocked at the extent to which hospital doctors were affected by stress at work.

For my part I was delighted to be re-elected to the TUC General Council for the fourth successive year – something that continues to place the HCSA at the heart of the trade union movement.

Pay-off

We heard recently that David Flory, the Chief Executive of the Trust Development Agency (TDA), was to receive a huge pay-off from the government of over £400,000 – on top of his salary of £235,000 – following his decision to quit the job.

At a time when the NHS deficit looks set to hit £2 billion, how can this be justified?

What makes this even more amazing is that it comes at a time when the government have just agreed a cap on exit payments for public-sector workers at £95,000.

The government’s own consultation document started by saying: “The government announced on 23 May 2015 that it intended to end six-figure exit payments for public sector workers.”

Over 4,000 responses were received despite a very short consultation period. The outcome was that the government will legislate to introduce a cap. But it would appear that this particular cap is not a one-size-fits-all.